Tag Archives: mountains

Compact vs standard

Moving to a standard chainset seems like a rite of passage for a cyclist. No pro would be seen astride a compact. But hang on a minute… I’m still riding compact.

So, what am I doing? Well, my winter bike is my old bike, bought some 7 years ago when I rode a bit less. Standard wasn’t even a question then. My summer bike is newer, but I wanted to spec it to ride in the mountains. My usual Essex and Regents Park training routes don’t include the sort of climbs that demand fewer teeth than a standard 53/39. That bike is for the mountains too and I didn’t want to be switching chainsets around. So compact is good enough.

Only recently when racing could I really have done with some extra gears at the top end (although perhaps that was me more than the bike). Now I find myself riding a 11-25 cassette to get the most out of my compact chainset.

In two weeks I’ll be in the Alps. Stage three of this year’s Haute Route Alps takes in Col de la Madeleine, Col du Glandon and the ascent to Alpe d’Huez. One thing I know, is I’m not yet ready to take on its 4,600m of elevation gain on a standard.

That’s the difference between me and them.

Proscore: 3/10

For even more on gear ratios – CyclingTips have a great post here: Beyond the big ring

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Countdown

Countdown. Three weeks until the Haute Route Alps begins in Geneva. After some time out from training for the wedding, what is the best way to prepare in these last precious weeks?

One of the biggest lessons I learned from last year was not to underestimate the importance of a taper. With two weeks to go, I got ill, probably after training too much in the month or two before that. I don’t want to make the same mistake again this year, but with two weeks of time out on honeymoon, that’s less likely.

What did work well for me last year were a couple of big weeks on the bike, separated with more rest than I thought prudent. We’re talking 3-5 consecutive long days of 4-5 hours in the saddle and plenty of long climbs thrown in. Last year the Basque country and the Pyrenees provided the climbing. This year I’m doing my best to replicate this in Regents Park and Essex. Not quite the Tourmalet is it? Still, I’m in the middle of two weeks focussed on long hard rides, simulating climbs with long threshold intervals, throwing in as many consecutive days as I can. It’s hard to replicate the demands of the mountains, but this is the best I can do, and in that, I am not alone.

As for my taper, two weeks of downtime is vital to arriving at the start line fresh. I have heard a lot about riders’ condition improving as they go deeper into multi-day events. For me that never really happened last year. Now I suspect it was because I was too fatigued going into the Haute Route week. So this time I’m taking a different approach and will be making sure that I arrive on the start line in Geneva fresher, if perhaps a bit less fit. I will need an iron will to stay off the bike. Easier said than done, but nothing compared to what I’ll need in three weeks’ time.

photo-12

Essex ‘climb’ intervals on strava: Essex 45mins x2